Cyber Monday & Black Friday by the Numbers

Welcome back math educators! I hope you had a wonderful and restful Thanksgiving! Christmas is right around the corner and most of us have about 17 days until the Winter Break. Our students may will be distracted by the merriment of the season so we will have to use all of the tools in our engagement toolbox to keep them focused and learning!

Did you take advantage of the Black Friday shopping deals? My husband enjoys Black Friday but I prefer to sleep in! My favorite day is Cyber Monday and I already have my Amazon.com list ready! I noticed that many of my children’s (ages 14 and 10) friends participated in the Black Friday shop-a-thon…so here are a couple of sites with great Black Friday and Cyber Monday data that may interest and engage your students in math:

Cyber Monday vs. Black Friday: By the Numbers http://news.yahoo.com/s/theweek/20101126/cm_theweek/209717

This is a brief article by The Week with some interesting numerical information about these “new holidays”:

1869
Year the phrase “Black Friday” was coined; it originally referred to a catastrophic stock market crash

2005
Year the phrase “Cyber Monday” was coined by the National Retail Federation’s Shop.org as a “gimmick to jump-start online sales in the holiday season”

$887 million
Online sales revenue generated on Cyber Monday in 2009, a 5 percent increase over the previous year — matching the record for the “heaviest online shopping day” ever (December 9, 2008)

$595 million
Online sales revenue generated on Black Friday in 2009, a 10 percent increase over the previous year

Black Friday by the Numbers http://money.blogs.time.com/2010/11/24/black-friday-by-the-numbers/

An article by Time.com:

$0 Cost of standard shipping for many online purchases made through the holiday season at Walmart, Amazon, L.L. Bean, and other major retailers.

$0 Amount of money that will be spent by consumers on Friday, November 26, who are participating in Buy Nothing Day, an anti-consumer, no-spending day that just so happens to fall on the same day as Black Friday.

0:00 Time of day on Friday—a.k.a. midnight on Thanksgiving evening—when retail centers such as the Tanger Outlets and Premium Outlets open their doors to shoppers. Last year, Toys R Us also opened at midnight on Thanksgiving night, but in 2010, its stores will open even earlier, with a “24-hour savings extravaganza” starting at 10 p.m. on Turkey Day.

3:00 The ungodly time on Friday not-quite-morning when Kohl’s stores open, an hour earlier than slackers such as Macy’s and J.C. Penney.

I hope you have a wonderful week! I am off to look for more Cyber Monday deals. Be sure to check out Gizmodo’s Ultimate Black Friday Cheat Sheet http://gizmodo.com/5696851/the-ultimate-black-friday-2010-cheat-sheet?skyline=true&s=i

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